Aeolian Soundscape

Aeolian Soundscape

Aeolian Soundscape

The aeolian harp derives its name from the Greek god of the wind, Aeolus, as only the wind can play this instrument. Aeolian harps produce a harmonious sound based on the resonance alike that of chanting. It is believed that the aeolian harp has been around for centuries, dating back at least to the 6th century BC during the time of the Greeks. The earliest written account of Aeolian harps appeared in “Phonurgia nova,” which was published by Athanasius Kircher in 1673. By the Romantic Era they were commonplace in households. In the course of history, aeolian harps disappeared from culture for centuries, resurfacing only during the Renaissance when artists and musicians began to revive them.

Our exhibit will leverage the windy landscape of Ontario Place to create an interactive musical harp that approaches the concept of an aeolian harp from a renewed perspective through the use of a reciprocal frame structure. Lamella structures are spatial systems consisting of segments called lamellae. By arranging members in a grid pattern, long freeform spans can be achieved from relatively short members, and complex forms from geometrically simple components. This approach is extremely economical as it contains many uniform elements, leading to a structure that is less wasteful and easily assembly.

Visitors of all ages can engage with our installation from a visual perspective where technical expertise in geometrical fabrication is displayed and auditory senses are activated through winds and breezes that highlights the local soundscape of Ontario Place. The fluorescent nylon strings and UV painted lamellae members of our installation coupled with Black LED lighting will accentuate the nighttime experience.


Artists

  •  John Nguyen
    John Nguyen

    John Nguyen, Nicholas Hoban, and Brady Peters are award winning designers, researchers, and educators specializing in computational design, robotics, and digital fabrication at the University of Toronto. Collectively, they oversee the Acoustics Research Group, Robotics Lab, and Digital Fabrication Facilities at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design. The group conducts research in the domain of Mass Timber, Clay 3D Printing, Complex Geometry, Acoustics, Metamaterials, and Robotic Fabrication.

  • Nicholas Hoban
    Nicholas Hoban

    John Nguyen, Nicholas Hoban, and Brady Peters are award winning designers, researchers, and educators specializing in computational design, robotics, and digital fabrication at the University of Toronto. Collectively, they oversee the Acoustics Research Group, Robotics Lab, and Digital Fabrication Facilities at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design. The group conducts research in the domain of Mass Timber, Clay 3D Printing, Complex Geometry, Acoustics, Metamaterials, and Robotic Fabrication.

  • Brady Peters
    Brady Peters

    John Nguyen, Nicholas Hoban, and Brady Peters are award winning designers, researchers, and educators specializing in computational design, robotics, and digital fabrication at the University of Toronto. Collectively, they oversee the Acoustics Research Group, Robotics Lab, and Digital Fabrication Facilities at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design. The group conducts research in the domain of Mass Timber, Clay 3D Printing, Complex Geometry, Acoustics, Metamaterials, and Robotic Fabrication.

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